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Die Heuning Pot Literature Guide
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Themes

All the violence and terror in Medea is caused by Jason's betrayal of his wife Medea. Her sheer rage at his unfaithfulness drives her to commit horrific acts of bloody revenge. Ironically, Medea's fury at her husband's betrayal drives her to the use of trickery and manipulation, which are really just another form of betrayal. Medea shows how, when one person betrays another, all may be corrupted.

Questions About Betrayal

  1. In what ways can Medea's manipulations be seen as betrayal?
  2. Does Jason's betrayal justify Medea's revenge?
  3. Is Jason's second marriage really a betrayal at all? Why or why not?
  4. Could Medea's murder of her children be interpreted as a betrayal?

Chew on This

Try on an opinion or two, start a debate, or play the devil’s advocate.

Jason's unfaithful behavior and lack of sensitivity towards Medea is symbolic of the overall unfair treatment of women.

Jason never betrayed his family or Medea; he only acted in their best interest by marrying Glauke.

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