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Quotes

Quote #4

[O]ften he heard them say how much they appreciated his sister's work, whereas until now they had frequently been annoyed with her because she had struck them as being a little useless. (2.19)

All is not an utter catastrophe now that Gregor is unable to work (see Quote # 3 above). With her new responsibilities, Grete has a new sense of self-sufficiency and independence that her parents appreciate. Gregor's dismal projection about his family's life without him is proven false; in fact, it hints that his evaluation of his importance to the family is overblown.

Quote #5

His mother, incidentally, began relatively soon to want to visit Gregor, but his father and his sister at first held her back with reasonable arguments to which Gregor listened very attentively and of which he whole-heartedly approved. But later she had to be restrained by force […] and cried out, "Let me go to Gregor, he is my unfortunate boy! Don't you understand that I have to go to him?" (2.19)

In contrast to Mr. Samsa, Mrs. Samsa seems to maintain her love for Gregor. She even defends Gregor when she thinks that Mr. Samsa is about to kill him (see Quote #8 under "Morality and Ethics"). But despite her maternal feelings, Mrs. Samsa is still unable to stomach the sight of Gregor.

Quote #6

[H]is father had put the worst interpretation on Grete's all-too-brief announcement and assumed that Gregor was guilty of some outrage […] [H]is father considered only the strictest treatment called for in dealing with him. (2.27-8)

Gregor can't catch a break from his dad. As in Quotes #1 and 2, Mr. Samsa continues to be portrayed as an unfeeling, domineering authority figure who wields punishment before guilt is established.

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