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Midnight's Children

Midnight's Children

by Salman Rushdie

Foreignness And 'The Other' Quotes

How we cite our quotes:

Quote #1

He also felt - inexplicably - as though the old place resented his educated, stethoscoped return. Beneath the winter ice, it had been coldly neutral, but now there was no doubt; the years in Germany had returned him to a hostile environment. (1.1.8)

This scene occurs when Aadam Aziz returns to Kashmir after five years learning to be a doctor in Germany. Do you think the environment is really hostile? Or is it just that Aadam Aziz has changed?

Quote #2

And was knocked forever into that middle place, unable to worship a God in whose existence he could not wholly disbelieve. Permanent alteration: a hole. (1.1.9)

The perforated sheet! It rears its ugly head when Aadam Aziz is knocked into "that middle place." In other words, he becomes the other. Why does it show up here?

Quote #3

To the ferryman, the bag represents Abroad; it is the alien thing, the invader, progress. And yes, it has indeed taken possession of the young Doctor's mind; and yes, it contains knives, and cures for cholera and malaria and smallpox; and yes, it sits between doctor and boatman, and has made them antagonists. (1.1.42)

Seriously though, what is Tai's beef with the new Dr. Aziz? Why is he so against progress?

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