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The Mill on the Floss

The Mill on the Floss

by George Eliot

Analysis: Plot Analysis

Most good stories start with a fundamental list of ingredients: the initial situation, conflict, complication, climax, suspense, denouement, and conclusion. Great writers sometimes shake up the recipe and add some spice.

Initial Situation

Beginning of the book until Tom leaves school

In these early chapters we are introduced to nearly all the main characters and get detailed sketches of Tom, Maggie, and their often stormy relationship. These chapters give us a good understanding of the types of people that Tom and Maggie are and also set up a lot of the book’s major plot strands, namely the disastrous lawsuit and the feud with the Wakems.

Conflict

The Tullivers lose their lawsuit and Mr. Tulliver becomes very ill. Tom and Maggie must leave school and work; the family is disgraced

Tom and Maggie’s childhoods come to an abrupt end when their father loses his lawsuit. The family falls into financial ruin and all the Tullivers despair at ever paying off their debts. And Mr. Tulliver’s health is failing. Mr. Wakem also buys this mill during this stage, which causes further conflict between the Tulliers and the Wakems.

Complication

Maggie experiences a religious awakening and then begins a secret friendship with Philip

Maggie turns to an extreme form of religion to help her cope. After a few years of this she meets Philip again and is eventually convinced to meet with him secretly. During this entire time, Maggie has a lot of inner turmoil and questions where her loyalties lie: to Philip, to her family, or to herself. Maggie is also confused as to whether or not she really loves Philip.

Climax

From Tom’s discovery of Maggie’s relationship with Philip to the death of Mr. Tulliver

There’s actually a series of climaxes, one on top of the other here. First Tom discovers Maggie’s hidden relationship with Philip and forbids her from ever seeing him again. Maggie bows to Tom’s wishes after some internal strife. Shortly after this, the Tullivers are able to pay off their debts, but the occasion is ruined when Mr. Tulliver attacks Mr. Wakem. Mr. Tulliver dies shortly after this and the family is forced to leave the mill.

Suspense

Tom and Maggie are estranged and a love quadrangle develops between Philip, Stephen, Lucy, and Maggie. This stage ends with Stephen’s and Maggie’s disastrous elopement and their break-up

The stalemate that settles in after Mr. Tulliver’s death is disrupted by the growing relationship between Maggie and Stephen. After fighting their feelings, the two end up eloping. But Maggie quickly changes her mind and they break-up. Maggie is now disgraced and has hurt those closest to her.

Denouement

After Maggie returns to St. Ogg’s until the flood

Things start to wrap up in this stage. Maggie returns home and is shunned by the town. But the people closest to her, including Philip and Lucy, forgive her. Maggie makes amends with everyone except Tom.

Conclusion

The flood and the death of Tom and Maggie and the epilogue

The action surges once again during the flood. Tom and Maggie finally reconcile but they both die tragically in the flood. In an epilogue we learn that the other characters survive the flood and move on with their lives.

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