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Mirror

Mirror

  

by Sylvia Plath

Mirror Theme of Transformation

A transformation that takes place throughout "Mirror" is the personification of the mirror; through personification, the poem transforms a mirror into a speaking, feeling narrator. Then, in the jump between the first and second stanzas, the mirror transforms into a lake. Lastly, the woman in the poem sees herself transforming from a young girl to an old woman.

Questions About Transformation

  1. How real does the mirror's personification feel for you?
  2. What is the effect of the mirror's transformation into a lake?
  3. What role does the passing of time play in the transformations that occur in this poem?

Chew on This

Try on an opinion or two, start a debate, or play the devil’s advocate.

The mirror's transformation into a lake makes the woman's transformation from a young girl into an old woman more vivid.

The transformation, through personification, of an inanimate mirror into a talking narrator, makes the poem's discussion of appearances more interesting.

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