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Mockingjay

Mockingjay

by Suzanne Collins

Mockingjay Themes

Little Words, Big Ideas

Manipulation

Katniss has been a pawn in the Capitol's game since her first Hunger Games, but every step of the way she resisted. After escaping from the Quarter Quell to District 13, we thought our girl would f...

Warfare

The war in Mockingjay is an extension of the battles in the Hunger Games arena described in The Hunger Games and Catching Fire. Before, the scale of war was much smaller, but just as lethal. The tw...

Power

Power comes in many forms. There are the people who appear to have power, and then there are the ones who actually do. We see plenty of both in Mockingjay. Katniss is a great example, as the Mockin...

Courage

In stories and movies about war, we expect to see acts of courage, and Mockingjay doesn't disappoint. The novel's characters display their courage in all sorts of ways: by acting and by not acting,...

Love

Even though the characters are focused, for the most part, on waging a war, love creeps into the story. There are lots of kinds of love in Mockingjay: love for one's country, one's people, one's di...

Friendship

When going to war, it's good to have friends to rely on; they watch your back, and when things get dark, they give you a reason to keep on fighting. In Mockingjay, though, Katniss starts losing her...

Admiration

It's not easy being a figurehead or a celebrity warrior – your body and ideas aren't your own to show to the world. Katniss is greatly admired – so much that she's turned into the Mockingjay, t...

Sacrifice

The entire Hunger Games trilogy is based on an act of sacrifice: Katniss taking her sister's place in the Hunger Games. When Katniss wins the Games, it should complete the sacrifice and she should...
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