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Teaching Guide

Teaching Night

Let's illuminate this thing.

GO TO STUDENT LEARNING GUIDE

Night is a slim book, yes; but boy is it a doozy. You have your work cut out for you, and as always, Shmoop's got your back.

In this guide you will find

  • an activity about the concentration camp experiences of Elie Wiesel and Anne Frank, in case one tragedy wasn’t enough for you.
  • a virtual field trip to Auschwitz.
  • essay questions exploring themes of faith and family.

And much more.

Consider our teaching guide a flashlight for illuminating the Night.

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Inside each guide you'll find quizzes, activity ideas, discussion questions, and more—all written by experts and designed to save you time. Here are the deets on what you get with your teaching guide:

  • 13-18 Common Core-aligned activities to complete in class with your students, including detailed instructions for you and your students. 
  • Discussion and essay questions for all levels of students.
  • Reading quizzes for every chapter, act, or part of the text.
  • Resources to help make the book feel more relevant to your 21st-century students.
  • A note from Shmoop's teachers to you, telling you what to expect from teaching the text and how you can overcome the hurdles.

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Instructions for You

Objective: Sadly, Elie Wiesel was only one of many children who suffered greatly during the Holocaust. As we all know, countless others lost everything they knew because of hatred and greed. Most of our students have probably heard of Anne Frank, so as an introduction (or a connection), Shmoop will help them connect these two children who were forced to quickly become adults.

Length of Lesson: 1 class period + an essay as homework

Materials Needed: Access to information about Anne Frank and Elie Wiesel.

Step 1: Shmoop has read a lot about including prior knowledge in our students' work, so we want to take that idea to heart. So let's begin this introductory lesson with a background knowledge question or two:

  • Define the Holocaust. What was it? When was it? Why did it happen? 
  • Identify Anne Frank. Who was she? Why is she famous?

Step 2: After we hear what the students have to say, let's tell them some things they don't know. Using Shmoop's World War II people list, have the students read about Hitler and FDR.

Make sure they jot down a few notes as they're poking around. Who are these leaders and what are their guiding characteristics?

Step 3: Now we are going to get them ready to connect all this knowledge to Night.

Using the Biography Channel's information on Anne Frank and the Nobel Prize Organization's information on Elie Wiesel, have the students create a Venn diagram. What did Anne Frank and Elie Wiesel have in common? How were their stories different?

Step 4: Last but not least, the students will put all that they've learned about Hitler, FDR, Anne, and Elie together. In a short essay, the students will reflect on the multiple causes, effects, and reactions to the Holocaust. What happened? How were children involved? What can we learn from what happened?

Instructions for Your Students

Sadly, Elie Wiesel was only one of many children who suffered greatly during the Holocaust. As we all know, countless others lost everything they knew because of hatred and greed. You've probably heard of Anne Frank, and in this activity, you will connect these two children who were forced to quickly become adults.

Step 1: How about a background question or two to get us started? As you discuss as a class, remember to be specific. B-E specific. B-E-S-P-E… you know the rest.

  • Define the Holocaust. What was it? When was it? Why did it happen? 
  • Identify Anne Frank. Who was she? Why is she famous?

Step 2: Now let's learn a few things that we don't already know. Using Shmoop's World War II people list, read about Hitler and FDR. Also known as VIHFs: Very Important Historical Figures.

Make sure you jot down a few notes as you're poking around. Who are these leaders and what are their guiding characteristics?

Step 3: What does this all have to do with Night? You're about to find out.

Using the Biography Channel's information on Anne Frank and the Nobel Prize Organization's information on Elie Wiesel, create a Venn diagram. What did Anne Frank and Elie Wiesel have in common? How were their stories different?

Step 4: Last but not least, let's put all that you've learned about Hitler, FDR, Anne, and Elie together. In a short essay, reflect on the multiple causes, effects, and reactions to the Holocaust. What happened? How were children involved? What can we learn from what happened?

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Common Core Standards  

The following standards are covered in this course:

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.1
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.3
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.6
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.7
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.5
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.2
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.4
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.10
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.1
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.2
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.6
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.3
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.5
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.6
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.4
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.7
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.10
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.1
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.2
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.11-12.6
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.2
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.3
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.6
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.9
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.4
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.10
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.5
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.7
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.2
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.3
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.6
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.1
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.4
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.9
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.10
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.5
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.7
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.L.1
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.L.3
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.L.4
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.L.6
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.L.2
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.R.1
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.R.4
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.R.7
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.R.9
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.R.10
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.R.2
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.R.3
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.SL.1
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.SL.2
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.SL.6
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.W.3
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.W.4
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.W.9
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.W.10
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.W.2
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.W.5
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.W.1
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.2
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.3
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.4
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.5
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.10
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.7
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.1
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.3
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.4
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.6
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.2
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9-10.5
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.11-12.2
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.11-12.4
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.11-12.5
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.11-12.7
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.11-12.10
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.11-12.3
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.11-12.1
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.11-12.3
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.11-12.4
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.11-12.6
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.11-12.2

WANT MORE HELP TEACHING NIGHT?

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