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No Longer At Ease

No Longer At Ease

  

by Chinua Achebe

Analysis: Narrator Point of View

Who is the narrator, can she or he read minds, and, more importantly, can we trust her or him?

Third Person (Limited Omniscient)

This book is told in the third person, looking in from the outside on Obi's life, habits, and thoughts. We are not privy to other people's ideas or thoughts, unless they express them to Obi. This narrative technique allows us to inspect Obi's life and thoughts from a distance, analyzing them for discrepancies. At the same time, we get to see his choices and ideas close enough to feel sympathy. We recognize that Obi is a man caught between two different worlds as society around him is rapidly transformed. The next generation will not feel the same sense of alienation he feels. The third person limited omniscient allows us both to observe Obi's contradictory behavior, while feeling sympathy for his situation.

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