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So We'll Go No More a Roving
So We'll Go No More a Roving
by George Gordon, Lord Byron

So We'll Go No More a Roving Analysis

Symbols, Imagery, Wordplay

Form and Meter

Anapest-y Iambic Trimeter (Fact: It Is Kind of a Pest.)The meter of this poem is mostly iambic trimeter. That means there are supposed to be three (tri-) iambs per line. (An iamb is an unstressed s...

Speaker

A guy who's getting tired of doing what he always does: that's the best way to describe this guy. This is partly because he's begun to worry just a little bit about getting older, about death. The...

Setting

Venice, 1817. And no, not Venice, California. Venice, Italy—the real Venice, the Venice after which the California one was named, the city that is surrounded by water where everybody uses boats i...

Sound Check

First and foremost, this poem sounds like a song if we ever heard one—and not just any song, but a kid's song, sort of. Think about it; it rhymes every other line pretty regularly, the lines are...

What's Up With the Title?

The title is the first line of the poem, and it tells us that this is going to be a poem about a dude who's made an important decision: not to rove. Roving—that's a word that means wandering, roa...

Calling Card

RovingWhen we say roving is Byron's trademark, we don't mean the word "roving," although that may be true. We mean the very idea of roving—wandering, roaming, travelling. This idea is everywhere...

Tough-o-Meter

(1) Sea Level This poem shouldn't give you too much trouble. Sure, it's not always clear what the speaker means when he says things like "loving," but in general his sentences are pretty short and...

Trivia

Byron was only 36 years old when he died. Wow, such an old man. Not. (Source.) Byron is rumored to have had an incestuous relationship with his half-sister, Augusta Leigh. That's some serious rovin...

Steaminess Rating

PGOkay so there's nothing obviously sexual about this poem, but "loving"? Going out late and loving? Sometimes, that can be a very delicate way of referring to something sexual, and we know from By...

Allusions

Literary and Philosophical References"The Jolly Beggar," an old Scots song (Title, 1, 11)

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