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Types of Numbers

Types of Numbers

Comparing Decimals


When comparing decimal numbers to see which is bigger, first we look at the numbers before the decimal point. If one is greater than the other, we're done. Stick a fork in us. For example, 4.6248 is definitely bigger than 3.9998, because that 4 in front of the decimal point is bigger than 3.

If the numbers out front are identical (like with 0.4 and 0.562), we compare the tenths place. Since 4 is smaller than 5, we'd say that 0.4 is smaller than 0.562, or 0.4 < 0.562.

If the whole number and the tenths place digits are identical, just keep going till you can compare two digits in the same spot. For example, say we're comparing 0.2337 and 0.2318. Both decimals start with a 0, and both have a 2 in the tenths place and a 3 in the hundredths place. But when we get to the thousandths place, we have a 3 in 0.2337 and a 1 in 0.2318. Since 3 is bigger than 1, we can say 0.2337 > 0.2318.

BTW, adding extra zeros to the end of a decimal doesn't change its value at all: 08 = 080 = 0800 = etc. It just makes it longer and more annoyed. Trust us, you do not want to taunt or provoke a decimal.

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