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An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge

An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge

by Ambrose Bierce

Justice and Judgment Quotes

How we cite our quotes:

Quote #4

"The commandant has issued an order, which is posted everywhere, declaring that any civilian caught interfering with the railroad, its bridges, tunnels, or trains will be summarily hanged. I saw the order." (2.3)

The Federal scout dressed like a Confederate soldier informs Farquhar of the new law enacted by the military. Civilians who choose to involve themselves in the war will be subject to military punishments. Does this seem fair to you? Why or why not?

Quote #5

The captain had drawn his pistol, but did not fire; the others were unarmed. Their movements were grotesque and horrible, their forms gigantic. (3.4)

As personifications of military justice, the captain and the soldiers are monumental and forbidding.

Quote #6

A rising sheet of water curved over him, fell down upon him, blinded him, strangled him! The cannon had taken a hand in the game. (3.12)

As Farquhar attempts to escape from his executioners, the narrator calls him "the hunted man" (3.10) and the soldiers' attempts to kill Farquhar a game. Are we supposed to read the soldiers' efforts to kill Farquhar as the pursuit of justice or some twisted form of entertainment?

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