From 11:00PM PDT on Friday, July 1 until 5:00AM PDT on Saturday, July 2, the Shmoop engineering elves will be making tweaks and improvements to the site. That means Shmoop will be unavailable for use during that time. Thanks for your patience!
We have changed our privacy policy. In addition, we use cookies on our website for various purposes. By continuing on our website, you consent to our use of cookies. You can learn about our practices by reading our privacy policy.
© 2016 Shmoop University, Inc. All rights reserved.
The Odyssey

The Odyssey

  

by Homer

Laodamas

Character Analysis

A Phaiakian prince, the son of Alkinoös and Arete. He wins the boxing match during the athletic games, before Odysseus beats everyone at everything. He challenges Odysseus in the games, saying that "it beseems you to know athletics, for there is no greater glory that can befall a man living than what he achieves by speed of his feet or strength of his hands" (8.145-151).

We don't want to say anything bad about our hosts, but we have to say this kind of rubs us the wrong way. He's basically like that guy who's constantly challenging you to an arm wrestling match.

Advertisement