The Old Man and the Sea
The Old Man and the Sea
by Ernest Hemingway
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The Old Man and the Sea Man and the Natural World Quotes Page 7

Page (7 of 9) Quotes:   1    2    3    4    5    6    7    8    9  
How we cite the quotes:
Citations follow this format: (Day.Paragraph). We artificially created chapters by defining "days," because there are no chapter breaks in Old Man and the Sea. Here’s how we divided up the days:
  • Day 1 = the start of the book until the old man falls asleep for the night
  • Day 2 = begins when the old man wakes up and goes until sunrise of the next day
  • Day 3 = begins at sunrise and goes until the old man dreams about the lions
  • Day 4 = begins when the old man wakes and ends when the old man gets back to his shack for the night
  • Day 5 = begins with the boy seeing the old man in the morning and goes until the end of the book
Quote #19

After that he began to dream of the long yellow beach and he saw the first of the lions come down onto it in the early dark and then the other lions came and he rested his chin on the wood of the bows where the ship lay anchored with the evening off-shore breeze and he waited to see if there would be more lions and he was happy. (3.133)

The old man’s similarity to the lions is heightened as he becomes part of the natural world.

Quote #20

"I’ll just steer south and west," he said. "A man is never lost at sea and it is a long island." (4.38)

The old man is so comfortable in the natural world that he believes he could never be lost at sea.

Quote #21

He did not need a compass to tell him where southwest was. He only needed the feel of the trade wind and the drawing of the sail. I better put a small line out with a spoon on it and try and get something to eat and drink for the moisture. But he could not find a spoon and his sardines were rotten. So he hooked a patch of yellow Gulf weed with the gaff as they passed and shook it so that the small shrimps that were in it fell onto the planking of the skiff. There were more than a dozen of them and they jumped and kicked like sand fleas. The old man pinched their heads off with his thumb and forefinger and ate them chewing up the shells and the tails. They were very tiny but he knew they were nourishing and they tasted good. (4.79)

The old man relies on the sea for sustenance.

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