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The Old Man and the Sea

The Old Man and the Sea

  

by Ernest Hemingway

Analysis: Writing Style

Hemingway-esque

Yes, that’s right, the man gets his own style name. That’s because Hemingway is famous for his short, factual sentences and the declarative nature of his words. He popularized this style at a time when people were peppering parenthetical prepositional phrases into their work like there was no tomorrow. It’s as though everyone else was painting huge oil canvases, and Hemingway drew a penciled sketch that was somehow better than all the other works of the time. Pretty impressive stuff.

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