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On First Looking Into Chapman's Homer

On First Looking Into Chapman's Homer

by John Keats

On First Looking Into Chapman's Homer Resources

Websites

Chapman's Homer

Yup, this is the whole translation of Homer's works by George Chapman. See what all the fuss is about.

Poetry Foundation

The Poetry Foundation has put together a biography of Keats that gives you more than you could ever need.

Keats on Poets.org

The American Academy of Poets hosts a concise introduction to John Keats, many of his important poems, and a bibliography of his work.

Englishhistory.net

Here's a small site with some helpful commentary, but (most importantly) a copy of Keats's original manuscript of the poem. It includes a different line seven.

Video

Bright Star

This is a trailer for the independent film about John Keats and his true love, Fanny Brawne. Watch it and you'll see just how Romantic Keats was.

Fluffy Clouds

This is a very slow mediation on some clouds at sunset, with the poem in the background.

Images

The Original

Here's a copy of Keats's original manuscript of the poem. It includes a different line seven.

Death Mask

This is a mask made of Keats' face after his early death.

Audio

Poet Ted Hughes Reads

The former British Poet Laureate delivers a fine reading of the poem.

Graham Jane

Check out this… uh, funky and smooth interpretation.

Articles and Interviews

Selected Keats Letters

Keats wrote some of the most famous letters of any English poet—beautiful love letters to Fanny Brawne and insightful commentary on the life of a poet.

Books

Complete Poems and Selected Letters of John Keats

This edition of Keats's work was edited by noted critic and poet Edward Hirsch.

John Keats

Walter Jackson Bate's biography of Keats won the Pulitzer Prize for its incredible insight into his life and work.

History of America

Maybe a bit of a snoozer these days, but this is the history book that Keats had been reading when he wrote the poem. You can see the passage he read about Balboa (but then confused with Cortez).

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