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Quotes

Quote #4

By this time Orlando had abandoned all hope of discussing his own work with the poet; but this mattered the less as the talk now got upon the lives and characters of Shakespeare, Ben Jonson, and the rest, all of whom Greene had known intimately and about whom he had a thousand anecdotes of the most amusing kind to tell. Orlando had never laughed so much in his life. These, then, were his gods! Half were drunken and all were amorous. Most of them quarrelled with their wives; not one of them was above a lie or an intrigue of the most paltry kind. Their poetry was scribbled down on the backs of washing bills held to the heads of printer's devils at the street door. (2.24)

You know that huge, giant pedestal where Orlando has put writers and poets? Nick Greene takes a machete to that pedestal and exposes writers as ordinary drunkards. Yet these men are actually geniuses. As we will see later in the novel with Pope, having genius doesn’t make someone an extraordinary person. Rather, it makes an ordinary person who happens to have an extraordinary gift.

Quote #5

Thus, at the age of thirty, or thereabouts, this young Nobleman had not only had every experience that life has to offer, but had seen the worthlessness of them all. Love and ambition, women and poets were all equally vain. Literature was a farce. The night after reading Greene's Visit to a Nobleman in the Country, he burnt in a great conflagration fifty-seven poetical works, only retaining 'The Oak Tree', which was his boyish dream and very short. (2.33)

Greene’s satire forces Orlando to take a cold hard look at his amateur efforts; after this incident he focuses his writing and matures quite a lot.

Quote #6

So then he tried saying the grass is green and the sky is blue and so to propitiate the austere spirit of poetry whom still, though at a great distance, he could not help reverencing. 'The sky is blue,' he said, 'the grass is green.' Looking up, he saw that, on the contrary, the sky is like the veils which a thousand Madonnas have let fall from their hair; and the grass fleets and darkens like a flight of girls fleeing the embraces of hairy satyrs from enchanted woods. 'Upon my word,' he said (for he had fallen into the bad habit of speaking aloud), 'I don't see that one's more true than another. Both are utterly false.' And he despaired of being able to solve the problem of what poetry is and what truth is and fell into a deep dejection. (2.38 – 2.39)

Here’s another indication that literature and nature hold antagonistic positions in Orlando. Nature defies being captured by literature.

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