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A Passage to India

A Passage to India

by E.M. Forster

A Passage to India Part 2, Chapter 20 Summary

  • Because of the incident, Adela now has the sympathy of all of the women who disliked her previously, including Mrs. Turton, Mrs. Callendar, and Mrs. Lesley.
  • All men in the civil administration (and their wives) have gathered at the club to discuss the upcoming weeks.
  • Turton asks the women to keep calm, and he tells them necessary safety precautions are being taken for Mohurram, a Muslim religious holiday that coincides with the trial.
  • Fielding asks about Adela's condition, but there is no update from Callendar. Mrs. Turton dismisses his question as unnecessary.
  • Turton asks the women to leave the men alone. In addition to the usual crowd, a stray soldier is also present.
  • The soldier suggests that the military be brought in to maintain order, but Turton dismisses this idea as overkill. He tells everyone to carry on as usual, but to get the women off to the hills as they usually are in advance of the summer heat. He asks them not to act any differently toward Indians. The soldier mentions that he met one Indian who seemed all right playing polo – ironically, that Indian was Aziz.
  • Then, Callendar comes in and announces that Adela is better, but has a temperature.
  • Callendar baits Fielding a little because he knows that Fielding believes Aziz to be innocent. Fielding holds back.
  • Next, Ronny comes in. Everyone stands out of deference to his troubles except Fielding. Both the Collector and the soldier demand Fielding to stand.
  • At this point, Fielding makes a personal statement. He contends that Aziz is innocent, and that he is waiting for the verdict of the courts. If Aziz is guilty, Fielding will resign from the club.
  • Fielding tries to leave, but the Collector demands that he apologize to Ronny first. Fielding refuses. The soldier blocks his exit. Ronny asks them to let Fielding go.
  • Fielding finally makes his exit from the club, but pauses on the upper verandah to gaze at the Marabar Hills.

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