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Quotes

Quote #1

Come live with me, and be my love (1)

This line can be scanned two ways: as regular iambic tetrameter (come live with me, and be my love), but also using spondees as the first and third feet (come live with me, and be my love). Does this shift in emphasis change your reading of love's role in the poem?

Quote #2

And I will make thee beds of roses,
And a thousand fragrant posies (9-10)

The mention of "beds" and "Roses" in line 9 is a dead giveaway that something with a romantic, somewhat steamy charge is going on in this poem. We mean, you don't go talking about beds unless you want to use one.

Quote #3

And if these pleasures may thee move,
Come live with me, and be my love (19-20)

Serious question: How does the use of the word "if" in this line change the speaker's offer of love?

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