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Paul's Case: A Study in Temperament

Paul's Case: A Study in Temperament

by Willa Cather

Paul's Case: A Study in Temperament: Quotes (Who Said What) Quiz

Think you’ve got your head wrapped around Paul's Case: A Study in Temperament? Put your knowledge to the test. Good luck — the Stickman is counting on you!
Q. How does the quote "When the symphony began Paul sank into one of the rear seats with a long sigh of relief, and lost himself as he had done before the Rico. It was not that symphonies, as such, meant anything in particular to Paul, but the first sigh of the instruments seemed to free some hilarious and potent spirit within him (1.14)" reflect the value of live music?


Today Paul could just sit in his room and crank up the iPhone. In 1905, though, hearing music live was pretty much your only option. There was some primitive recording technology, but it hardly fit in a cabinet, much less your pocket.
Recorded music provides a more intimate connection that is more able to free a response from deeper within our souls.
Live music pulls a person in to the stresses of life.
Classical music is the pits.
Q. What is the significance of the following quote?: "Not once, but a hundred times, Paul had planned this entry into New York. He had gone over every detail of it with Charley Edwards, and in his scrap book at home there were pages of description about New York hotels, cut from the Sunday papers (2.41)."


Paul is not poor, yet he can only imagine joy in a life of extravagance.
Paul has a very poor memory.
Paul has a compulsive behavior disorder.
Paul suffers from deep anxieties and low self-esteem.
Q. What is the significance of the following quote?: "On the eighth day after his arrival in New York, he found the whole affair exploited in the Pittsburgh papers, exploited with a wealth of detail which indicated that local news of a sensational nature was at a low ebb. The firm of Denny & Carson announced that the boy's father had refunded the full amount of the theft, and that they had no intention of prosecuting (2.5)."


Because of Paul's misbehavior, the audience rejects Paul and wants to see him doing worse.
Paul was still bound to his roots and couldn't completely escape from his past.
Paul was going to jail.
Paul is a hillbilly.
Q. What is the significance of the following quote?: ""[I]n his scrap book at home there were pages of description about New York hotels, cut from the Sunday papers. When he was shown to his sitting-room on the eighth floor, he saw at a glance that everything was as it should be; there was but one detail in his mental picture that the place did not realize, so he rang for the bell boy and sent him down for flowers. (2.41)"


This fantasy reflects Paul's second-hand vision of what rich people do.
This fantasy reflects the reality of what rich people do.
Paul was still living in a fantasy and couldn't face reality.
Hotel descriptions are always accurate.
Q. What is the significance of the following quote?: "He was horribly afraid of rats, so he did not try to sleep, but sat looking distrustfully at the dark, still terrified lest he might have awakened his father (1.21)."


His father used to punish him by locking him in the basement where there were rats.
It is strange that Paul would sleep with rats rather than wake his father.
Paul loves rats.
Paul suffered from severe panic attacks.
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