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The Picture of Dorian Gray

The Picture of Dorian Gray

by Oscar Wilde

Appearances Quotes Page 1

How we cite our quotes:

Quote #1

"I really can't see any resemblance between you, with your rugged strong face and your coal-black hair, and this young Adonis, who looks as if he was made out of ivory and rose-leaves. Why, my dear Basil, he is a Narcissus, and you -- well, of course you have an intellectual expression and all that. But beauty, real beauty, ends where an intellectual expression begins. Intellect is in itself a mode of exaggeration, and destroys the harmony of any face. The moment one sits down to think, one becomes all nose, or all forehead, or something horrid. Look at the successful men in any of the learned professions. How perfectly hideous they are! Except, of course, in the Church. But then in the Church they don't think. A bishop keeps on saying at the age of eighty what he was told to say when he was a boy of eighteen, and as a natural consequence he always looks absolutely delightful. Your mysterious young friend, whose name you have never told me, but whose picture really fascinates me, never thinks. I feel quite sure of that. He is some brainless beautiful creature who should be always here in winter when we have no flowers to look at, and always here in summer when we want something to chill our intelligence." (1.7)

Lord Henry is of the opinion that everything that matters exhibits itself in appearance, as though a person's thoughts and personality have some influence over the alignment of their features.

Quote #2

The painter bit his lip and walked over, cup in hand, to the picture. "I shall stay with the real Dorian," he said, sadly.

"Is it the real Dorian?" cried the original of the portrait, strolling across to him. "Am I really like that?"

"Yes; you are just like that."

"How wonderful, Basil!"

"At least you are like it in appearance. But it will never alter," sighed Hallward. "That is something." (2.34)

Huh…Basil's wistful comment hits closer to home than he can possibly realize at this stage. The portrait is the real Dorian – more real than its artist can even conceive of. So real, in fact, that it has to alter eventually…

Quote #3

"You can dine with me to-night, Dorian, can't you?"

He shook his head. "To-night she is Imogen," he answered, "and to-morrow night she will be Juliet."

"When is she Sibyl Vane?"

"Never."

"I congratulate you."

Of course Lord Henry would congratulate Dorian for this. After all, he only values things because of their appearance, and a girl who is all appearance (and no inner self) would be perfect, in his eyes.

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