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Die Heuning Pot Literature Guide
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Quotes

Quote #4

"Life has everything in store for you, Dorian. There is nothing that you, with your extraordinary good looks, will not be able to do."

"But suppose, Harry, I became haggard, and old, and wrinkled? What then?"

"Ah, then," said Lord Henry, rising to go, "then, my dear Dorian, you would have to fight for your victories. As it is, they are brought to you. No, you must keep your good looks. We live in an age that reads too much to be wise, and that thinks too much to be beautiful. We cannot spare you." (8.19)

Again, we see the importance of youth emerge as an important theme – Lord Henry emphasizes how valuable it is, and how it spares Dorian from the difficulties of life. We don't exactly blame Dorian for thinking that his youth is more valuable than anything else – his best friend certainly seems to think that's true.

Quote #5

For there would be a real pleasure in watching it. He would be able to follow his mind into its secret places. This portrait would be to him the most magical of mirrors. As it had revealed to him his own body, so it would reveal to him his own soul. And when winter came upon it, he would still be standing where spring trembles on the verge of summer. When the blood crept from its face, and left behind a pallid mask of chalk with leaden eyes, he would keep the glamour of boyhood. Not one blossom of his loveliness would ever fade. Not one pulse of his life would ever weaken. Like the gods of the Greeks, he would be strong, and fleet, and joyous. What did it matter what happened to the coloured image on the canvas? He would be safe. That was everything. (8.25)

Dorian's eternal youth seems assured now, and it allows him to relax. We can see just how warped his perspective is from this moment – he values youth and beauty above the health of his soul, and even thinks he'll take pleasure in watching the latter crumble.

Quote #6

He had the key, and no one else could enter it. Beneath its purple pall, the face painted on the canvas could grow bestial, sodden, and unclean. What did it matter? No one could see it. He himself would not see it. Why should he watch the hideous corruption of his soul? He kept his youth -- that was enough. And, besides, might not his nature grow finer, after all? There was no reason that the future should be so full of shame. Some love might come across his life, and purify him, and shield him from those sins that seemed to be already stirring in spirit and in flesh -- those curious unpictured sins whose very mystery lent them their subtlety and their charm. Perhaps, some day, the cruel look would have passed away from the scarlet sensitive mouth, and he might show to the world Basil Hallward's masterpiece. (10.13)

For a moment, Dorian feels the optimism that comes with the prospect of eternal youth – not only does he get to remain beautiful, he also has infinite time to change and improve himself. Unfortunately, this moment of hope doesn't last.

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