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Themes

Little Words, Big Ideas

Family

Annika and Tommy have one. Pippi doesn't. So where does that leave her in Pippi Longstocking? Not all that bad off, as it turns out. She's got a house, two animal housemates to share it with, and a...

Education

Education, shmeducation. Who needs it anyway? Well maybe Tommy and Annika. They do, after all, attend school every day in Pippi Longstocking, and no one ever suggests that they shouldn't. Not even...

Gender

Sugar and spice and everything nice? Snips and snails and puppy dog tails? Whatever you think boys and girls are made of, you can forget it—Pippi Longstocking takes traditional gender roles and t...

Society and Class

It's hard for individuals to find their place in society. Societies have to have rules, and the rules don't always suit all the individuals, but it's even harder when the individuals are individual...

Youth

Pippi, like Peter Pan, embraces her youth—every single moment of it. Though some adults in Pippi Longstocking definitely have a children should be seen not heard approach to kids, the overall tak...

Strength and Skill

Obviously Pippi's super strong, but why do you think Astrid Lindgren made her that way? Sure it's funny to think of her lifting cows and horses and policemen, so comic relief is part of the reason,...

Isolation

It might shock you to think about isolation as a theme in Pippi Longstocking—after all, she's so funny and she always comes out on top. But when it comes right down to it, Pippi is alone in the w...

Principles

What does it mean to be a principled person? Can you still be a principled person if you:lie on a regular basis? disrupt coffee parties? defy authority figures? skip school? con...
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