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The Plague

The Plague

  

by Albert Camus

The Plague Truth Quotes

How we cite our quotes: Citations follow this format: (Part.Chapter.Paragraph). We used Stuart Gilbert's translation.

Quote #28

And it was in the midst of shouts rolling against the terrace wall in massive waves that waxed in volume and duration, while cataracts of colored fire fell thicker through the darkness, that Dr. Rieux resolved to compile this chronicle, so that he should not be one of those who hold their peace but should not bear witness in favor of those plague-stricken people; so that some memorial of the injustices and outrage done them might endure; and to state quite simply what we learn in a time of pestilence: that there are more things to admire in men than to despise. (5.5.41)

Rieux’s conclusion is the least objective statement ever. Or at least throughout the course of The Plague. He declares the humanist point of view that man is good, valuable, and worth saving.

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