Die Heuning Pot Literature Guide
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12
Quote #1

Mr. Bennet treated the matter differently. "So, Lizzy," said he one day, "your sister is crossed in love, I find. I congratulate her. Next to being married, a girl likes to be crossed a little in love now and then. It is something to think of, and it gives her a sort of distinction among her companions. When is your turn to come? You will hardly bear to be long outdone by Jane. Now is your time. Here are officers enough in Meryton to disappoint all the young ladies in the country. Let Wickham be your man. He is a pleasant fellow, and would jilt you creditably." (24.26)

LOL, Dad. It's so hilarious when one of your daughters is totally humiliated by the man who everyone thought she was going to marry. Right? Right?? We don't know if Mr. Bennet was ever capable of love, or whether his experiences with his wife just crushed his idealism, but either way he's not setting a very good example for his daughters.

Quote #2

Mr. Bennet treated the matter differently.  "So, Lizzy," said he one day, "your sister is crossed in love, I find.  I congratulate her.  Next to being married, a girl likes to be crossed a little in love now and then.  It is something to think of, and it gives her a sort of distinction among her companions.  When is your turn to come?  You will hardly bear to be long outdone by Jane.  Now is your time.  Here are officers enough in Meryton to disappoint all the young ladies in the country.  Let Wickham be your man.  He is a pleasant fellow, and would jilt you creditably." (43.27)

As always, there's a truth behind Mr. Bennet's sarcasm. Here he's making fun of drama queens whose tragedy du jour gives them a certain amount of cache among their girlfriends.

Quote #3

"Do not make yourself uneasy, my love. Wherever you and Jane are known you must be respected and valued; and you will not appear to less advantage for having a couple of—or I may say, three—very silly sisters." (43.20)

Just one more example of how little Mr. Bennet understand about the way family works. It's like a nightmare version of the Three Musketeers, you know, one for all and all for one: what Lydia does reflects badly on the entire family. (But we have to ask: if Kitty and Mary had been sensible, would Lydia's personality have mattered less? Could four good reputations outweigh one bad?)

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