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Probability and Statistics

Probability and Statistics

Independent and Dependent Events Exercises

Example 1

Determine whether the event is independent or dependent:

Rolling 5 on a die and flipping tails on a coin.

Example 2

Determine whether the event is independent or dependent:

Flipping heads on a coin and then flipping tails on that same coin.

Example 3

Determine whether the event is independent or dependent:

Drawing a king from a deck of cards and then, without replacing the king, drawing a queen from the same deck of cards.

Example 4

Using the formal definition of independence, determine whether events A and B are independent or dependent when we roll two dice.

Event A: Rolling 1 on the first die.

Event B: The dice summing to 7.

Example 5

Using the formal definition of independence, determine whether events A and B are independent or dependent when we flip three coins.

Event A: The first two coins are heads.

Event B: There are at least two heads among the three coins.

Example 6

Using the formal definition of independence, determine whether events A and B are independent or dependent.

Given two spinners (this sort of thing) that each have the numbers 1, 2, and 3 (in place of the colors), we spin two numbers.

Event A: Spinning an odd number on the first spinner.

Event B: The sum of the two numbers being odd.

Okay, so you ready to take this exercise for a spin? It even still has that "new problem smell"...