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Psalms

Psalms

Psalms Man, God, & The Natural World Quotes Page 1

How we cite our quotes:(Chapter:Verse)

Quote #1

What are human beings that you are mindful of them, mortals that you care for them?
Yet you have made them a little lower than God, and crowned them with glory and honor.
You have given them dominion over the works of your hands; you have put all things under their feet. (NRSV 8:4-6)

What is man, that thou art mindful of him? and the son of man, that thou visitest him?
For thou hast made him a little lower than the angels, and hast crowned him with glory and honor.
Thou madest him to have dominion over the works of thy hands; thou hast put all things under his feet. (KJV 8:4-6)

There's a natural hierarchy here: divine beings, humans, and finally animals. Poor animals. Humans though, are doing things up Spidey-style: they have both great power and great responsibility. God is the creator, but he's put quite a bit of trust in man.

Oh, and don't forget to check out the translation differences. The King James translators weren't so cozy with the idea of comparing mortals and God, so they added angels to the list.

Quote #2

The Lord also thundered in the heavens,
and the Most High uttered his voice.
And he sent out his arrows, and scattered them;
he flashed forth lightnings, and routed them.
Then the channels of the sea were seen,
and the foundations of the world were laid bare
at your rebuke, O Lord,
at the blast of the breath of your nostrils. (NRSV 18:13-15)

The Lord also thundered in the heavens, and the Highest gave his voice; hail stones and coals of fire.
Yea, he sent out his arrows, and scattered them; and he shot out lightnings, and discomfited them.
Then the channels of waters were seen, and the foundations of the world were discovered at thy rebuke, O Lord, at the blast of the breath of thy nostrils. (KJV 18:13-15)

This is fire and brimstone at its best. And while they're at it, the writers compare natural events (lightning) to weapons (arrows). How poetic.

Quote #3

God restores my soul.
He leads me in right path for his name's sake.
Even though I walk through the darkest valley, I fear no evil;
for you are with me; your rod and your staff — they comfort me. (NRSV 23:3-4)

He restoreth my soul: he leadeth me in the paths of righteousness for his names sake.
Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil: for thou art with me; thy rod and thy staff, they comfort me. (KJV 23:3-4)

Look how much more jazzed-up the words are in the King James Version. And whether you like it or not, those are the words most of us remember: "I walk through the valley of the shadow of death" resonates way more with English speakers than "I walk through the darkest valley," right?

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