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Summary

Chapter Summaries

Psalms Psalms 3-15 Summary

Psalm 3

  • Change in the winds, folks. The writer's not so cocky here—he's surrounded. God is (hopefully) ready to answer his prayers.

Psalm 4

  • And…more club talk. This is one cool tree-house to be in; faith in God sets the writer apart, and helps him even more than eating a ton or drinking wine. Go figure.

Psalm 5

  • Take heed, everyone: God's a jealous partner. To be disloyal or rebellious is worse than death. You become the worst kind of outcast.

Psalm 6

  • The writer is sick and hopes God will give him some NyQuil and a good old-fashioned dose of enemy-humiliation to make him feel dandy again.

Psalm 7

  • They're after us again. This time, the enemies of the Lord are upon the writer, who prays for a swift, violent end to his persecutors.

Psalm 8

  • Here, the writer offers proof of God's existence. Yep. The natural world, and man's mastery of it, makes him feel that all's right with the world.

Psalm 9

  • Seems like God has delivered for the writer, but now he wants more. Hey, it's the ancient world; a lion could maul you in your sleep, or your king's sworn enemies might sack your city. We should cut the guy some slack for being needy.

Psalm 10

  • The faithless here are worthless, and God notices everything. He's like Santa, but with way better presents. Especially when things go badly quickly for the meek, God will be there.

Psalm 11

  • Newsflash: God hates violence. Oh, but he seems totally willing to use it. Sounds better to be on his side in war.

Psalm 12

  • Times are tough in Bible-town in Psalm 12. Generational conflict abounds, but the writer remains confident that God remains ever-present.

Psalm 13

  • God is absent for most of this psalm—the perfect occasion to write a poem about him….

Psalm 14

  • Once again, faithless = evil. But beware, fellow Shmoopers: the writer is referring to people who follow other gods. Atheism didn't fly back then.

Psalm 15

  • The faithful have a certain set of standards. The most important standard of all? To remain faithful. Fancy that.
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