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Psalms Psalms 79-88 Summary

Psalm 79

  • The writer pleads for God's return to Jerusalem after it's been sacked (i.e., this is a post-exilic composition). He also asks God to work through his anger issues and penchant for destruction...just with other nations...

Psalm 80

  • God is as a gardener—again—who took Israel as "a vine" from Egypt. What gives, God? Tend to your plant!

Psalm 81

  • God is angry. Really angry. Israel has started to look at different gods, and clearly this doesn't fly with him. Watch out.

Psalm 82

  • God has been promoted. He's now at the head of the divine council, and he's handing out bonuses to his believers.

Psalm 83

  • Time to roll up your sleeves: the Israelites have some late night work to do. What, you ask? Annihilating their enemies, of course.

Psalm 84

  • The author would rather be a doorman in God's temple than in the thick of somebody else's temple. That's like saying you'd rather be a doorman at the Plaza than the owner of a motel in Ruralsville, U.S.A.

Psalm 85

  • Here, the author expresses confidence that the land will produce lots of grain, that the righteous will be rewarded, and that everything will be hunky-dory. Three cheers for stability!

Psalm 86

  • Ah, if only life were so simple, and if only the writer's heart was undivided. It's hard to be faithful forever, but the writer knows he can do it.

Psalm 87

  • God designates Zion as his preferred pad.

Psalm 88

  • Depression's back. God has abandoned the writer, and this is one guy who needs some lovin'. Better call up God.

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