From 11:00PM PDT on Friday, July 1 until 5:00AM PDT on Saturday, July 2, the Shmoop engineering elves will be making tweaks and improvements to the site. That means Shmoop will be unavailable for use during that time. Thanks for your patience!
We have changed our privacy policy. In addition, we use cookies on our website for various purposes. By continuing on our website, you consent to our use of cookies. You can learn about our practices by reading our privacy policy.
© 2016 Shmoop University, Inc. All rights reserved.

Body Parts

Symbolism, Imagery, Allegory

A person should always be more than the sum of their parts, right? But with this myth's descriptions of the statue's body, it's hard to remember that. Ovid in particular really dwells on Galatea's lips, skin, and limbs. He even goes so far as to comment on the bounciness of her… veins. Yeah.

This intense focus on her body speaks to the fact that Pygmalion isn't really interested in the statue's personality. Instead, he's 100% focused on her hot bod. This reinforces the idea that the only thing that matters about a woman is her body—a message that, unfortunately, gets repeated a lot in contemporary society.

People who Shmooped this also Shmooped...

Advertisement