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The Return of Sherlock Holmes

The Return of Sherlock Holmes

  

by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

The Return of Sherlock Holmes Criminality Quotes

How we cite our quotes: Citations follow this format: (Story.Paragraph) or (Story.Section.Paragraph) if applicable.

Quote #10

"You will ruin no more lives as you have ruined mine. You will wring no more hearts as you wrung mine. I will free the world of a poisonous thing. Take that, you hound - and that! - and that! - and that! - and that!"

She had drawn a little gleaming revolver, and empties barrel after barrel into Milverton's body, the muzzle within two feet of his shirt front. (Milverton.1.108-9)

In one of the book's more dramatic and violent scenes, we get a depiction of justifiable homicide in action as a wronged woman gets revenge against her blackmailer. Holmes defends this murder even though it was planned and deliberate.

Quote #11

"I have not seen a man who, if he turns his talents that way, was more calculated to fill the gap left by the illustrious Moriarty." (Three-Quarter.147)

Again, the criminals and detectives are linked together. Both groups are potentially united by talent and similar skills but are ultimately separated by choice.

Quote #12

"Do you think I was sorry? Not I! It was his life or mine, but far more than that, it was his life or hers, for how could I leave her in the power of his madman? That was how I killed him." (Three-Quarter.163)

This is one of the bolder confessions in the book, and one of the more unapologetic ones as well. It's interesting that Jack Crocker uses the word "kill" rather than murder here. How does this compare with some of the other confessions of killing/murder in these stories?

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