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Robinson Crusoe

Robinson Crusoe

by Daniel Defoe

Foreignness and 'the Other' Quotes

How we cite our quotes:

Quote #1

By the best of my Calculation, that Place where I now was, must be that Country, which lying between the Emperor of Morocco's Dominions and the Negro's, lies wast and uninhabited, except by wild Beasts; the Negroes having abandon'd it and gone farther South for fear of the Moors; and the Moors not thinking it worth inhabiting by reason of its Barrenness; and indeed both forsaking it because of the prodigious Numbers of Tygers, Lyons, Leopards and other furious Creatures which harbour there; (25)

Because of his role in trade, Crusoe comes into contact with many other foreign cultures.

Quote #2

I could not tell what Part of the World this might be, otherwise than that I know it must be Part of America, and as I concluded by all my Observations, must be near the Spanish Dominions, and perhaps was all Inhabited by Savages, where if I should have landed, I had been in a worse Condition than I was now; and therefore I acquiesced in the Dispositions of Providence, which I began now to own, and to believe, order'd every Thing for the best; (93)

Crusoe finds himself very far from England. In fact, he's near savages.

Quote #3

Besides, after some Pause upon this Affair, I consider'd, that if this Land was the Spanish Coast, I should certainly, one Time or other, see some Vessel pass or re-pass one Way or other; but if not, then it was the Savaage Coast between the Spanish Country and Brasials, which are indeed the worst of Savages; for they are Cannibals, or Man-eaters, and fail not to murther and devour all the humane Bodies that fall into their Hands. (93)

Completely disoriented, Crusoe finds himself amidst savages.

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