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Robinson Crusoe
Robinson Crusoe
by Daniel Defoe
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Robinson Crusoe Man and the Natural World Quotes Page 3

Page (3 of 4) Quotes:   1    2    3    4  
How we cite the quotes:
(Page Number). We used the 2008 Oxford World Classics edition.
Quote #7

Those who understand such Enclosures will think I had very little Contrivance, when I pitch'd upon a place very proper for all these, being a plain open Piece of Meadow-Land, or Savanna, (as our People call it in the Western Collonies,) which had two or three little Drills of fresh Water in it, and at one end was very woody. I say they will smile at my Forecast, when I shall tell them I began my enclosing this Piece of Ground in such a manner, that my Hedge or Pale must have been at least two Mile about. (124)

Crusoe cultivates the land and encloses it. This is a sign of possessing or owning the land.

Quote #8

Then to see how like a King I din'd too all alone, attended by my Servants, Poll, as if he had been my Favourite, was the only Person permitted to talk to me. My Dog who was no grown very old and crazy, and had found no Species to multiply his Kind upon, sat always at my Right Hand, and two Cats, one on one Side the Table, and one on the other, expecting now and then a Bit from my Hand, as a Mark of Special Favour. (126)

Notice the hierarchy that Crusoe instills in his organization of the natural world.

Quote #9

You are to understand, that now I had, as I may call it, two Plantations in the Island; one my little Fortification or Tent, with the Wall about it under the Rock, with the Cave behind me, which by this Time I had enlarg'd into several Apartments or Caves, one within another. One of these, which was the driest, and largest, and had a Door out beyond my Wall or Fortification; that is to say, beyond where my Wall joyn'd to the Rock, was all fill'd up with the large Earthen Pots, of which I have given an Account, and with fourteen or fifteen great Baskets, which would hold five or six Bushels each, where I laid up my Stores of Provision, especially my Corn, some in the Ear cut off short from the Straw, and the other rubb'd out with my Hand. (128)

While money has no use on the island, Crusoe still accumulates things: two houses, supplies, and goods.

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