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Robinson Crusoe

Robinson Crusoe

by Daniel Defoe

Rules and Order Quotes

How we cite our quotes:

Quote #7

While I was making this March, my former Thoughts returning, I began to abate my Resolution; I do not mean, that I entertain'd any Fear of their Number; for as they were naked, unarm'd Wretches, 'tis certain I was superior to them; nay, though I had been alone; but it occurr'd to my Thoughts, What Call? What Occasion? Much less, What Necessity I was in to go and dip my  Hands in Blood, to attack People, who had neither done, or intended me any Wrong? (195)

Crusoe considers the right law and order with which to regulate the cannibals on the island. Is it necessary for him to intervene if this is merely their custom?

Quote #8

My Island was now peopled, and I thought my self very rich in Subjects; and it was a merry Reflection which I frequently made, How like a King I look'd. First of all, the whole Country was my own meer Property; so that I had an undoubted Right of Dominion. 2dly, My people were perfectly subjected: I was absolute Lord and Law-giver; they all owed their Lives to me, and were ready to lay down their Lives, if there had been Occasion of it, for me. It was remarkable too, we had but three Subjects, and they were of three different Religions. My Man Friday was a Protestant, his Father was a Pagan and a Cannibal, and the Spaniard was a Papist: However, I allow'd Liberty of Conscience throughout my Dominions: But this is by the Way. (203)

Crusoe sees himself as the ruler of the natural order on the island.

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