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Quotes

Quote #4

I smil'd to my self at the Sight of this Money, O Drug! Said I aloud, what art tho good for, Thou art not worth to me, no not the taking off of the Ground, one of those Knives is wroth all this Heap, I have no Manner of use for thee, e'en remain where thou art, and go the Bottom as a Creature whose Life is not worth saving.

On the island, Crusoe realizes that whatever money he might find in the wreckage of the ship is simply worth nada. Wealth will mean something entirely different.

Quote #5

But all I could make use of, was, All that was valuable. I had enough to eat, and to supply my Wants, and, what was all the rest to me? If I kill'd more Flesh than I could eat, the Dog must eat it, or the Vermin. If I sow'd more Corn than I could eat, it must be spoil'd. The Trees that I cut down, were lying to rot on the Ground. I could make no more use of them than for Fewel; and that I had no Occasion for, but to dress my Food. (110)

On the island, there is no purpose in accumulating more than Crusoe can use.

Quote #6

In a Word, The Nature and Experience of Things dictated to me upon just Reflection, That all the good Things of this World, are no farther good to us, than they are for our Use; and that whatever we may heap up indeed to give others, we enjoy just as much as we can use, and more. The most covetous griping Miser in the World would have been cur'd of the Vice of Covetousness, if he had been in my Case; for I possess'd infinitely more than I knew what to do with. (110)

Crusoe realizes that there are things that should be valued for their use. He reflects and determines this to be the general state of things.

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