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Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry

Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry

  

by Mildred D. Taylor

Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry Education Quotes

How we cite our quotes: (Chapter.Paragraph)

Quote #1

Because the students were needed in the fields from early spring when the cotton was planted until after most of the cotton had been picked in the fall, the school adjusted its terms accordingly, beginning in October and dismissing in March. But even so, after today a number of the older students would not be seen again for a month or two, not until the last puff of cotton had been gleaned from the fields, and eventually most would drop out of school altogether. (1.91)

The schools here are definitely separate and unequal. Remember that this was before the whole Brown v. the Board of Education, which overturned Plessy v. Ferguson (which allowed for separate but equal—supposedly—schooling).

Quote #2

"And to all our little first grade friends only today starting on the road to knowledge and education, may your tiny feet find the pathways of learning steady and forever before you." (1.103)

What is Miss Crocker's tone here? Do you think she is honestly concerned for the children's education? What do we know about her that might complicate this view?

Quote #3

"See, Miz Crocker, see what it says? They give us these ole books when they didn't want 'em no more." (1.143)

Cassie sees the degrading language in the schoolbook, and realizes that their school (the black school) only gets these "new" textbooks when they are totally unsuitable for the white children's school. Talk about humiliating.

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