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Quotes

Quote #1

'YES'M MIZ CROCKER," the children chorused.

But I remained silent. I never did approve of group responses. (1.107-08)

How does this "group response" compare to the "group response" of the mob in Chapter 11? How are both symptoms of the same disorder?

Quote #2

'S-see what they called us," I said, afraid she had not seen.

'That's what you are," she said coldly. (1.147-48)

Even when written in a book, the hateful world Cassie reacts to ("nigra") has the power to humiliate and put down. So why does her teacher seem not to mind?

Quote #3

'That's the nigger Sallie Ann said was flirtin' with her." (2.55)

Seems like an unimportant rumor, right? Wrong. This little bit of hearsay is the only justification the Wallace brothers need to go after the Berrys. Statements like this are more powerful coming from whites than from the blacks in this novel. Compare this to how Henrietta Toggins tries to tell the sheriff that the Wallaces have been bragging about burning the men. The sheriff does nothing, since it's her word (a black woman) against theirs (white men).

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