Cite This Page
 
To Go
Romance Sonambulo
Romance Sonambulo
by Federico Garcia Lorca

Romance Sonambulo Analysis

Symbols, Imagery, Wordplay

Form and Meter

Traditional Spanish Ballad (Romance)Lorca celebrated many aspects of his country in his work, and not the least of these is Spain's long-standing literary tradition. "Romance Sonambulo," then, uses...

Speaker

Really, we can sum up our speaker in one word: frustrated. He wants something he just can't have. (Again, it's important to note that the poem only ever identifies our speaker as an "I," so we're j...

Setting

This poem takes place in a variety of settings: on the sea, on a mountain, on the moon, under a balcony, and on an interstellar climbing expedition. If that sounds confusing, that's because, well,...

Sound Check

We like the translation we've used by William Logan. Really, we do. But, frankly, like a lot of translations, it pales in comparison to the original, especially in terms of the poem's sound. Sorry,...

What's Up With the Title?

The title? It's "Romance Sonambulo." 'Nuf said, right? Ah, we can see by the looks on your faces, Shmoopers, that perhaps that's not enough at all.Never fear. Shmoop's got your back. First of all,...

Calling Card

Andalusian Dream "Romance Sonambulo" is a quintessentially Lorca poem. It has all of the things his writing was known for. Let's break out the old checklist:Andalusian setting? Check. Andalusia is...

Tough-o-Meter

(6) Tree Line While the language (of this translation) is pretty straightforward, "Romance Sonambulo" can be almost deceptively simple. One minute it looks like smooth sailing, and the next you fin...

Trivia

Some critics have argued that "Romance Sonambulo" tells the story of a mortally wounded smuggler, who is seeking refuge as his girlfriend's house. What up with that? (Source.) Lorca many times call...

Steaminess Rating

PGFor a poem that's all about frustrated desire, there's very little sexiness going on here. Of course, that's where the frustration part comes in. Still, the speaker's motivations are not overtly...

Allusions

Historical ReferencesGates of Cabra (30)Guardias Civiles (81)

Need help with College?