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A Room of One's Own

A Room of One's Own

  

by Virginia Woolf

Mary Carmichael

Character Analysis

Mary Carmichael is the author of Life's Adventure, the book that Mary Beton reads as an example of the kind of writing women are doing today.

Hm, that's weird. There's no section on Amazon for Mary Carmichael's work. (Okay, well, there is—but wrong Mary Carmichael.)

That's because writers like Mary Carmichael toiled in obscurity, writing so-so books that were mostly about how hard it is to be a woman. Woolf uses Carmichael as an example of why women have a few generations to go before they'll produce a great writer (6.23).

Oh, and the other reason you can't find a copy of Life's Adventure is that Woolf made up both Mary Carmichael and her novel.