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Saint Joan

Saint Joan

  

by George Bernard Shaw

Saint Joan Women and Femininity Quotes

How we cite our quotes: Citations follow this format: (Scene.Line). Every time a character talks counts as one line, even if what they say turns into a long monologue.

Quote #4

JOAN: "I do not want to be thought of as a woman. […] I do not care for the things women care for. They dream of lovers, and of money." (3.49)

Joan seems to define most women as petty and selfish.

Quote #5

JOAN: "I wish you were one of the village babies."
DUNOIS: "Why?"
JOAN: "I could nurse you for awhile." (5.22-5.24)

This seems like an incredibly maternal thing for a person to say who doesn't want to be thought of as a woman.

Quote #6

THE INQUISITOR: "When maids will neither marry nor take regular vows […] then, as surely as the summer follows the spring, they begin with polygamy, and end by incest."

Whoa, really? Does this seem like a bit of leap to anybody else? We wonder if this is just a horror story told to keep women under men's control.

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