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Themes

Community can be pretty hard to come by. And for the characters in Seedfolks, there are plenty of things that can get in the way. Some people are afraid to meet new folks. Others believe the ridiculous stereotypes about their neighbors. And a handful of the characters even squabble with each other once the garden gets started. Nope, community isn't to be all rainbows and butterflies in this book. But with tons of hard work and a dash—okay, a lot—of friendliness, many of our characters learn to get along.

Questions About Community

  1. How does the Gibb Street garden help build a community? And what kind of community is it?
  2. Does the community in Seedfolks include different types of people? Or is it an exclusive community? How so?
  3. Is community in this book always a positive thing? Or are there negative elements to being part of a community?
  4. How does being part of a community help the characters discover something new about themselves?

Chew on This

Try on an opinion or two, start a debate, or play the devil’s advocate.

Community is essential. Seedfolks argues that without community, everything just plain falls apart.

Community is cool, but not necessary. In Seedfolks, the characters are pretty independent and don't really need community in order to survive.

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