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Quotes

Quote #1

All his life in Vietnam my father had been a farmer. Here our apartment house had no yard. But in that vacant lot he would see me. He would watch my beans break ground and spread, and would notice with pleasure their pods growing plump. He would see my patience and my hard work. I would show him that I could raise plants, as he had. I would show him that I was his daughter. (1.7)

If there's one thing Kim wants, it's a relationship with her dad. Growing her lima beans gives her a feeling that she can have a connection with him that stretches beyond the grave.

Quote #2

But my father, he worked all day in a kitchen with Mexicans and Salvadorans. His English was worse than a kindergartner's. He would only buy food at the bodega down the block. Outside of there he lowered his eyes and tried to get by on mumbles and smiles. He didn't want strangers to hear his mistakes. So he used me to make phone calls and to talk to the landlady and to buy things in stores where you had to use English. He got younger. I got older.

Then my younger brothers and mother and Tío Juan, her uncle, came north and joined us. Tío Juan was the oldest man in his pueblo. But her he became a little baby. He'd been a farmer, but here he couldn't work. (4.3-4)

Gonzalo's role in his family changes a lot when he moves from Guatemala to the United States. Being one of the only family members who speaks English means he needs to grow up pretty fast.

Quote #3

Watching him carefully sprinkling them into the troughs he'd made, I realized that I didn't know anything about growing food and that he knew everything. I stared at his busy fingers, then his eyes. They were focused, not far-away or confused. He'd changed from a baby back into a man. (4.9)

This garden sure is making waves in Gonzalo's family. When our man Gonzalo began helping Tío Juan start a plot in the community garden, he might not have realized what a big deal it would be. But check out how much Tío Juan transforms. Plus, we're pretty sure Gonzalo's relationship with Tío Juan will never be the same again.

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