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Sense and Sensibility

Sense and Sensibility

by Jane Austen

Dreams, Hopes, Plans Quotes Page 2

How we cite our quotes:

Quote #4

"You have no ambition, I well know. Your wishes are all moderate."

"As moderate as those of the rest of the world, I believe. I wish, as well as everybody else, to be perfectly happy; but, like everybody else, it must be in my own way. Greatness will not make me so." (17.2)

Good old Edward. His sole ambition is to get out from under his family's pressure and make his own way – and in so doing, find his own particular kind of happiness.

Quote #5

There were moments in abundance, when, if not by the absence of her mother and sisters, at least by the nature of their employments, conversation was forbidden among them, and every effect of solitude was produced. Her mind was inevitably at liberty; her thoughts could not be chained elsewhere; and the past and the future, on a subject so interesting, must be before her, must force her attention, and engross her memory, her reflection, and her fancy. (19.7)

Even practical Elinor isn't immune to daydreams, and despite her greatest efforts to "chain" her mind to practical thoughts, she can't help but digress.

Quote #6

As these considerations occurred to her in painful succession, she wept for him more than for herself. Supported by the conviction of having done nothing to merit her present unhappiness, and consoled by the belief that Edward had done nothing to forfeit her esteem, she thought she could even now, under the first smart of the heavy blow, command herself enough to guard every suspicion of the truth from her mother and sisters. And so well was she able to answer her own expectations, that when she joined them at dinner only two hours after she had first suffered the extinction of all her dearest hopes, no one would have supposed from the appearance of the sisters, that Elinor was mourning in secret over obstacles which must divide her for ever from the object of her love, and that Marianne was internally dwelling on the perfections of a man, of whose whole heart she felt thoroughly possessed, and whom she expected to see in every carriage which drove near their house. (23.3)

Sigh. Again, we have to say it – poor Elinor! She's just had her hopes and dreams crushed, and now she has to reevaluate her whole future life. To make matters worse, she can't even tell anyone about it.

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