Sense and Sensibility
Sense and Sensibility
by Jane Austen
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Sense and Sensibility Marriage Quotes Page 4

Page (4 of 4) Quotes:   1    2    3    4  
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Quote #10

His situation indeed was more than commonly joyful. He had more than the ordinary triumph of accepted love to swell his heart, and raise his spirits. He was released without any reproach to himself, from an entanglement which had long formed his misery, from a woman whom he had long ceased to love -- and elevated at once to that security with another, which he must have thought of almost with despair, as soon as he had learnt to consider it with desire. He was brought, not from doubt or suspense, but from misery to happiness; -- and the change was openly spoken in such a genuine, flowing, grateful cheerfulness, as his friends had never witnessed in him before. (49.1)

This is marriage at its best – everything resolved, and the rightful lovers reunited. Finally, after hundreds of pages of tension and crisis, it all falls into place. This endearing scene lets us know that when it's the right thing, there's nothing better than a good marriage.

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