We have changed our privacy policy. In addition, we use cookies on our website for various purposes. By continuing on our website, you consent to our use of cookies. You can learn about our practices by reading our privacy policy.
© 2016 Shmoop University, Inc. All rights reserved.
GO TO SAT PREP GO TO ACT PREP
The Shining

The Shining

  

by Stephen King

The Shining Chapter 49 Summary

How It All Goes Down

Halloran. Going Up the Country

  • It's a little before 2 pm when Halloran loses control of his car.
  • The weather is horrendous and he can barely see anything. Driving up into the mountains is terrifying. The road signs are barely legible because of the snow sticking to them.
  • He feels like a coward, as he thinks about giving up on trying to help Danny.
  • Still, the urge to get up there is strong. Also, Halloran is afraid of the visions he'll have to live with if he doesn't try the best he can.
  • He hits the snow covered road again. After a time he sees a snowplow coming from the opposite direction. It looks like it might hit him.
  • By some miracle, the driver of the snowplow and Halloran manage to avoid a crash.
  • After it passes, Halloran's car goes off the road and gets stuck in the snow.
  • Luckily, the snowplow driver, Howie Cottrell, is there to help. He's parked the plow just up ahead.
  • Halloran explains his urgency to get to the Overlook. The plow driver pulls his car back on the road.
  • He tells Halloran where he can rent a snowmobile in Sidewinder from his friend Larry Durkin.
  • As Halloran gets within ten miles of Sidewinder, he receives a super intense message in his head:

    (GET OUT OF HERE YOU DIRTY NIGGER TURN AROUND THIS IS NONE OF YOUR BUSSINESS […] TURN AROUND OR WE WE'LL KILL YOU HANG YOU UP FROM A TREE LIMB […]) (49.66)

  • He spins out his car and it stops.
  • Whew, that could have easily killed him if he was on the wrong place on the road.
  • He's terrified about what might be happening to Danny right now.
  • He gets the car started at half past six in the afternoon, "And he [is] beginning to feel it is very late indeed" (49.74).

People who Shmooped this also Shmooped...

Advertisement