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Siddhartha

Siddhartha

by Herman Hesse

Dissatisfaction Quotes

How we cite our quotes:

Quote #1

His father was to be admired, quiet and noble were his manners, pure his life, wise his words, delicate and noble thoughts lived behind its brow --but even he, who knew so much, did he live in blissfulness, did he have peace, was he not also just a searching man, a thirsty man? Did he not, again and again, have to drink from holy sources, as a thirsty man, from the offerings, from the books, from the disputes of the Brahmans? Why did he, the irreproachable one, have to wash off sins every day, strive for a cleansing every day, over and over every day? Was not Atman in him, did not the pristine source spring from his heart? It had to be found, the pristine source in one's own self, it had to be possessed! Everything else was searching, was a detour, was getting lost. (1.9)

Siddhartha is dissatisfied with the idea that he will follow in his father’s footsteps; even though his father is an upright man, Siddhartha sees that he lacks a true spiritual center.

Quote #2

"You will fall asleep, Siddhartha."

"I will not fall asleep."

"You will die, Siddhartha.

"I will die."

"And would you rather die, than obey your father?"

"Siddhartha has always obeyed his father." (1.40-45)

Siddhartha is willing to stand by his dissatisfaction.

Quote #3

A goal stood before Siddhartha, a single goal: to become empty, empty of thirst, empty of wishing, empty of dreams, empty of joy and sorrow. Dead to himself, not to be a self any more, to find tranquility with an emptied heard, to be open to miracles in unselfish thoughts, that was his goal. Once all of my self was overcome and had died, once ever desire and every urge was silent in the heart, then the ultimate part of me had to awake, the innermost of my being, which is no longer my self, the great secret. (2.3)

Siddhartha’s dissatisfaction has a very clear end, although the means might be a bit unknown.

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