From 11:00PM PDT on Friday, July 1 until 5:00AM PDT on Saturday, July 2, the Shmoop engineering elves will be making tweaks and improvements to the site. That means Shmoop will be unavailable for use during that time. Thanks for your patience!
We have changed our privacy policy. In addition, we use cookies on our website for various purposes. By continuing on our website, you consent to our use of cookies. You can learn about our practices by reading our privacy policy.
© 2016 Shmoop University, Inc. All rights reserved.
Slaughterhouse-Five

Slaughterhouse-Five

  

by Kurt Vonnegut

The Narrator's Dad

Character Analysis

The narrator's father only appears twice in the novel, but each time he seems to be fairly revealing of the narrator's own character. First, in Chapter 1, Section 4, when his father points out to the narrator that none of his books seem to have villains, the narrator answers that the war taught him not to cast anyone as a villain. This seems consistent with the narrator's overall point that Dresden's miseries are worth writing about even if Germany did terrible things during the war. After all, human suffering is human suffering.

The second place the narrator's father appears is in Chapter 10, Section 1, where the narrator tells us that he was a nice man with a gun collection, which he passed on to the narrator. The narrator never uses the guns, though; he had seen too much senseless violence in the war.

Advertisement