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Soliloquy of the Spanish Cloister

Soliloquy of the Spanish Cloister

by Robert Browning

Analysis: Calling Card

Poetry from the Point of View of the Psychologically Disturbed

Calling the speaker of "The Soliloquy of the Spanish Cloister" psychologically disturbed might even be a little generous. After all, this guy fantasizes about making a deal with the Devil to condemn a fellow monk to eternal damnation! But in the end, the speaker just grits his teeth and goes on with his life. If you want a Browning poem in which the speaker actually goes through with his plans – a speaker who is truly deranged instead of just disturbed – we suggest you try "Porphyria's Lover" or "My Last Duchess."

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