Die Heuning Pot Literature Guide
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Themes

This love poem takes it to a whole other level. The speaker of "somewhere i have never travelled, gladly beyond" isn't just kind of infatuated, or even in the throes of violent passion. His love is transcendent. He's so into this girl that it's like he's going through a religious conversion of some kind. His feelings for her connect him to something bigger than both of them, something that's infinite and ultimately unknowable. And that is pretty awesome and amazing.

Questions About Awe and Amazement

  1. Would you say that the speaker is a spiritual person? Why or why not?
  2. Do you think that death is portrayed as the end of everything, or the beginning? Why do you think so? 
  3. How can we perceive things that are beyond this world? Is it possible? Why do you think so?
  4. Usually we think of big things as awe-inspiring. Why do you think the speaker is awed by smallness and fragility in this poem?

Chew on This

Try on an opinion or two, start a debate, or play the devil’s advocate.

The poem elevates the power that the speaker's lover has over him to an almost god-like status. That's some serious awe.

Sorry, guys. The fact that the speaker thinks a human being can have so much power proves he's a total nut case.

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