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Song of Solomon

Song of Solomon

  

by Toni Morrison

Song of Solomon Theme of Man and the Natural World

We see our protagonist fight against the wilds of Virginia, unaccustomed to the problems it presents him. By contrast we see those people born in this wilderness navigate it effortlessly. The natural world in Song of Solomon represents a pastoral paradise, untainted by materialism and by corruption. At the same time, slavery and racism are present even in these rural pockets of society.

Questions About Man and the Natural World

  1. What does Milkman understand or hear in the "language" between the Shalimar hunters and their dogs?
  2. What examples of nature are we given in Song of Solomon?
  3. Does nature exist in the city, or do we only experience it in Danville and Shalimar?

Chew on This

Try on an opinion or two, start a debate, or play the devil’s advocate.

Milkman’s trek through nature reflects the trek through his internal self.

In Song, we see how nature forces a man to shed unnecessary materials and to use only his body and mind.

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