* Site-Outage Notice: Our engineering elves will be tweaking the Shmoop site from Monday, December 22 10:00 PM PST to Tuesday, December 23 5:00 AM PST. The site will be unavailable during this time.
Dismiss
© 2014 Shmoop University, Inc. All rights reserved.
The Sound and the Fury

The Sound and the Fury

by William Faulkner

Home Quotes

How we cite our quotes:

Quote #1

They were hitting little, across the pasture. I went back along the fence to where the flag was. It flapped on the bright grass and the trees. (1.4)

Benjy’s recognition of the loss of his field is one of the first observations we’re given in the novel (although his perspective doesn’t allow us to understand his description as a form of loss).

Quote #2

How long he had been there I didn't know, but he sat straddle of the mule, his head wrapped in a piece of blanket, as if they had been built there with the fence and the road, or with the hill, carved out of the hill itself, like a sign put there saying You are home again. (2.56)

The sight of a black man on the road becomes a universal symbol of home for Quentin. Stereotypical? Yes. Racist? Well, we’re really not sure.

Quote #3

He lay on the ground under the window, bellowing. We have sold Benjy's pasture so that Quentin may go to Harvard (2.89)

The family sells Benjy’s land to a golf course in order to buy Quentin’s education, which is supposed to be the hope of the family’s future…which is part of why his suicide is so traumatic for the Compsons.

People who Shmooped this also Shmooped...

Advertisement
Noodle's College Search
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement